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Our English grammar lesson for today is the model verb may. In the following lines, I will talk about the form/forms of may and the main uses of this model verb. We will also put may in sentences so you will be able to understand when to use it and when not.


May: The Form.

May is used for all for all persons (first person, second person and third person) in the future and present.
The Affirmative Form of the Model Verb May is I may….
The Negative form is May Not (Mayn’t).
The Interrogative is May I?
Negative interrogative form is May I Not?

MAY: DEFINITION AND USES

Permission

May is used for permission. The infinitive is to allow/to be allowed.


First Person:

We/I may mean that I/We have the permission to do something.

      Examples:

I may visit my girlfriend as soon as I have done my job here. But this construction is not very common. It is more usual to say:
I can leave/ am allowed to visit my girlfriend as soon as I have done my job here. However, it is possible to use I/we may/might in sentences in indirect speech.

Read the following examples:

-He says we may go
-He said we might go.

Second and Third Person

In the second and third person, may is mainly used when the speaker is refusing/giving permission.

Example of may for giving permission:

You may park your car in this park.
Normally, it does not mean that you are allowed to do that by another authority. If the speaker does not have any authority, he would probably say:
-          You can park your car in this spot (I give you the permission to park in this spot)
Or
-          You are allowed to park your car your car in this spot (You have a right to do so).

MAY IS USED FOR PERMISSION IN FORMAL SITUATIONS

Examples:

Students may not bring smart phones into the examination room.
Each team may choose one member to represent the rest.
You may keep using our streaming services. After that you must pay for the licence.

NOTE: we use allow in the past tense in indirect speech whether in the active or passive.

Examples:

I allowed him to attend a session for free last week.
Students were not allowed to bring textbooks the previous term.
We did not allow our children to go outside because of Coronavirus.

MAY: REQUESTS FOR PERMISSION


Both can and may are used to ask for permission. However, can is normally used in situations that are less formal than may. In requests, the difference between them is less marked. We can say: could/can/may I borrow your new edition of this book?
It is more appropriate to use may in formal situations to ask for permission. On the other side, could/can? is less formal than may I? .

NOTE: May I? is reported might I? (past) in the indirect speech.

Example:

She asked me if she might leave the office early.

Conclusion

Throughout this article, I tried to give you the meaning of the model verb may and clarify the uses of it with examples. I also made a comparison with other model verbs (can and could) to avoid confusion.




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THE MODEL VERB MAY: MEANING, FORM AND USES

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Easier said than done is our English idiom for today.

Easier said than done is an English idiom that is used  when something seems like a good idea but would be difficult to  do.


Example :


- Changing the world is easier said than done.- To give up an addiction is easier said than done.

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Easier Said Than Done

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Today’ lesson is dedicated to explain the present simple tense, the declarative, negative and interrogative forms of the present simple tense and the different uses of present simple with examples.

What is the present simple tense in English?

The simple present tense could be defined as a verb tense that is mainly used to show generalization, habit or repetition. This verb tense (present simple) is also used to talk about scheduled actions in the future and actions happening now in some situations. The following description explains the simple present in details and with present simple examples.

The Simple Present Form

How to form present simple? The simple present is considered the base form of the verb. Questions are always formed with the auxiliary verb “do” and negative form with “do not”.
This how for sentences in present simple tense (present simple’s sentences):
Statement: You learn English (Subject+ verb+ the rest of the sentence)
Question Form: Do you learn English? (Do + subject+ the rest of the sentence)
Negative Form: You do not learn English (Subject+ do not+ the rest of the sentence)
When we use the third person singular (He/ She/ It), we add -s or -es. Questions are formed with “does” and negative form with “does not”.
Statement: She learns English. (Subject+ verb with s or es + the rest of the sentence)
Question Form: Does she learn English? (does+ subject+ the rest of the sentence)
Negative Form: She does not learn English. (subject + does not+ the rest of the sentence)
After we have seen the present simple, I will give you the uses of the present simple tense with examples.
The uses of the present simple:
     Repetition
 one of the important uses of the present simple is to express an action that is usual or repeated. This action could be a hobby, a habit, a daily event, a scheduled event or anything that often happens. Here is a list of examples:
-          I speak English
-          She does not like ice cream:
-          The store opens every morning at 8:30 am.
-          The train does not arrive at 11:05 pm.
-          When does he usually go to work?
-          My mom cooks chicken every Saturday.
-          They never stay at home.
-          She is always busy.
-          The teacher always comes early.

Facts/ Generalization

 The present simple tense is used to express a fact that has been true over time or to make something general. The speaker uses present simple to express something that is true or believes that is true. Read the following examples of simple present:
Dogs like bons
Birds fly.
United Sates of America is a powerful country.
Russia is the largest country.
Most people believe in God.
Ghazel runs faster that rabbit.
Earth is not flat.
Cow has four legs.
Smoking affects health negatively.

Near actions/events

The simple present tense is also used to talk about events that are scheduled in the future (near future). This use is very common when it comes to talking about transportation. However, the present simple tense could be used to talk about planned events. The following examples make this kind of use very evident:
The bus leaves in 20 minutes.
The weather remains the same for a week.
Soccer games begin 1 hour later.
Exams take place on Friday.
Classes dismiss by the end of the month.

Instructions/directions

When you are in a situation of giving or receiving instructions/directions, the right tense to use is present simple tent. Here is some example of present simple:
-          Go outside and throw the trash.
-          Follow the instructions and do what he says.
-          Listen and write down.
-          First, open the window. Second, get in the room. Then, take the key under the table and open the door.

News Headlines

The present simple is used in news. Read the following examples:
The president declares an emergency state.
The mayor reveals her plans to avoid pollution.

Conclusion

The present simple tense is a very important tense in English language. Present simple is used for many reasons as we have seen. I hope this article was helpful. If you see it so, leave a comment and share it with your friends who want to learn English grammar.



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Present Simple Tense: Definition, Form, Uses and Examples!

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Today’ lesson is dedicated to explain the present simple tense, the declarative, negative and interrogative forms of the present simple tense and the different uses of present simple with examples.

What is the present simple tense in English?

The simple present tense could be defined as a verb tense that is mainly used to show generalization, habit or repetition. This verb tense (present simple) is also used to talk about scheduled actions in the future and actions happening now in some situations. The following description explains the simple present in details and with present simple examples.

The Simple Present Form

How to form present simple? The simple present is considered the base form of the verb. Questions are always formed with the auxiliary verb “do” and negative form with “do not”.
This how for sentences in present simple tense (present simple’s sentences):
Statement: You learn English (Subject+ verb+ the rest of the sentence)
Question Form: Do you learn English? (Do + subject+ the rest of the sentence)
Negative Form: You do not learn English (Subject+ do not+ the rest of the sentence)
When we use the third person singular (He/ She/ It), we add -s or -es. Questions are formed with “does” and negative form with “does not”.
Statement: She learns English. (Subject+ verb with s or es + the rest of the sentence)
Question Form: Does she learn English? (does+ subject+ the rest of the sentence)
Negative Form: She does not learn English. (subject + does not+ the rest of the sentence)
After we have seen the present simple, I will give you the uses of the present simple tense with examples.
The uses of the present simple:
     Repetition
 one of the important uses of the present simple is to express an action that is usual or repeated. This action could be a hobby, a habit, a daily event, a scheduled event or anything that often happens. Here is a list of examples:
-          I speak English
-          She does not like ice cream:
-          The store opens every morning at 8:30 am.
-          The train does not arrive at 11:05 pm.
-          When does he usually go to work?
-          My mom cooks chicken every Saturday.
-          They never stay at home.
-          She is always busy.
-          The teacher always comes early.

Facts/ Generalization

 The present simple tense is used to express a fact that has been true over time or to make something general. The speaker uses present simple to express something that is true or believes that is true. Read the following examples of simple present:
Dogs like bons
Birds fly.
United Sates of America is a powerful country.
Russia is the largest country.
Most people believe in God.
Ghazel runs faster that rabbit.
Earth is not flat.
Cow has four legs.
Smoking affects health negatively.

Near actions/events

The simple present tense is also used to talk about events that are scheduled in the future (near future). This use is very common when it comes to talking about transportation. However, the present simple tense could be used to talk about planned events. The following examples make this kind of use very evident:
The bus leaves in 20 minutes.
The weather remains the same for a week.
Soccer games begin 1 hour later.
Exams take place on Friday.
Classes dismiss by the end of the month.

Instructions/directions

When you are in a situation of giving or receiving instructions/directions, the right tense to use is present simple tent. Here is some example of present simple:
-          Go outside and throw the trash.
-          Follow the instructions and do what he says.
-          Listen and write down.
-          First, open the window. Second, get in the room. Then, take the key under the table and open the door.

News Headlines

The present simple is used in news. Read the following examples:
The president declares an emergency state.
The mayor reveals her plans to avoid pollution.

Conclusion

The present simple tense is a very important tense in English language. Present simple is used for many reasons as we have seen. I hope this article was helpful. If you see it so, leave a comment and share it with your friends who want to learn English grammar.



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Present Simple Tense: Definition, Form, Uses and Examples.

By Learning English →

The form of the present continuous tense

The present continuous tense is always formed with the auxiliary verb to be in the present simple tense + the infinitive +ing (the present participle).   
Examples:
I am typing.          She is crying.         They are reading.
The form of the present continuous tense is putting not between the auxiliary (verb to be in the present simple tense) and the verb +ing.
Examples of the negative form of the present continuous tense:
I am not running.      He is not studying.      They are not going.
To construct the interrogative form of the present tense continuous we invert subject and auxiliary
Examples of interrogative form of present continuous tense:
Am I writing?          Is he playing?         Are they following?
The present continuous tense of verb “to play” in all forms:
 The affirmative form of the present continuous tense.

-          I am playing
-          You are playing
-          He/she/it is playing.
-          We are playing.
-          They are playing
The negative form of the present continuous tense.

-          I am not playing.
-          You are not playing.
-          He/she/it is not playing.
-          We are not playing.
-          They are not playing.
The interrogative form of the present continuous tense.

-          Am I playing?
-          Are you playing?
-          Is He/She/It playing?
-          Are we playing?
-          Are they playing?


 THE PRESENT CONTINUOUS: USES

 The present continuous tense has many uses as we will see:

The present continuous tense is used to talk about actions happening now.

Examples:
She is talking to my friend (now).
He is reading a book.
We are having so much fun.
I am not wearing my jacket now.
Why are you having dinner this early?

The present continuous is used when we talk about an action happening in a period of time but not necessarily at the moment we are speaking. Read the following examples to understand more this use of the present continuous tense:

-          I am writing an essay about politics (This could mean at the speaking moment but it may also mean ‘now’ in a general sense/context)
-          They are working on a new project (they may not be doing that at the moment of speaking)

This tense (present continuous) is used to talk about definite arrangements in the future (near future). It is a common way to express immediate plans. Examples of present continuous tense for the near future use:

-          I am going back home tonight.
-          My boyfriend is taking to the theatre this evening.
A: Are you doing anything tomorrow?
B: I am watching a soccer game.
Verbs that are not normally used in the present continuous tense.

The continuous tense is normally used for deliberate actions. The following verbs are not normally used in the present continuous tense (continuous tenses in general):

·         Verbs of senses: smell, see, feel, hear… These verbs are usually express involuntary actions.
Examples:
I feel that you are not happy.
It smells good.
I hear you.
·         Verbs that express feelings/emotions: appreciate, adore, desire, care, like, dislike, detest, love, loathe, mind, wish, value, want…
I love this sweater.
We appreciate your loyalty.
I want to hear it from you now.
I adore how you look.
I don’t like this movie.

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Present Continuous Tense

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We can use 'could have' to talk about something somebody was capable of doing but didn't do.

• I could have gone to Oxford University    but I preferred Harvard.
• She could have married him but she    didn't want to.
• They could have bought a house here    20 years ago but chose not to.

Often, there is a sense of criticism.

• You could have phoned me to let me know.
• They could have helped me instead of just sitting there.
• I could have done more to help you. Sorry.

We can use 'couldn't have' to talk about something we were not capable of doing.

• I couldn't have managed without you.
• I couldn't have got the job. He was always going to appoint his nephew.
• I couldn't have enjoyed myself more. Thank you for a lovely day.

We can use 'could have' to speculate about what has happened. (We can also use 'may have' or 'might have' in these situations.)

• She could have taken the earlier train.
• Simon could have told her.
• They could have overheard what we said.

We can also use 'can have' to speculate about what has happened but only in questions and negative sentences and with words such as 'hardly', 'never' and 'only'.

• Can she have forgotten about our meeting?
• He can't have seen us.
• They can hardly have thought that I was not interested in the job.

We can also use 'could have' to speculate about something that didn't happen.

• You could have broken your neck, jumping out the window like that.
• He could have hurt somebody, throwing a bottle out of the window like that.
• I could have done well in my exam if I'd worked harder.

You can also use 'could have' to talk about possible present situations that have not happened.

• I could have been earning a lot as an accountant but the work was just too boring.
• He could have been Prime Minister now but he got involved in a big    financial scandal.
• They could have been the market leaders now if they had taken his advice.
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Can have / Could have

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Easier said than done is our English idiom for today.

Easier said than done is an English idiom that is used  when something seems like a good idea but would be difficult to  do.


Example :


- Changing the world is easier said than done.- To give up an addiction is easier said than done.

Tags:

Easier Said Than Done

By Learning English →